In Defence of My Copyright

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND GOOD BEHAVIOR

Writers who are publishing their original material on the internet very often have trouble protecting it from theft and illegal copying. They often publish articles based on extensive research and all sorts of original material that they have collected purposefully, be it on historical events and developments, on specific technical aspects, on biographical details of well and not too well known people, in fact about anything they have thought about and that you may probably thought of because you are looking for it.

How often did you - as an author - come accross an article that you had written and that article was published by someone on another web site. Just by copying and pasting, and pretending he or she was the original author. No reference visible, or just a meager mention of a link in the section "other sites on the subject" where your original page is mentioned along with other urls. It is also possible that a person copied a paragraph from your page without mentioning its origin.

I personally encounter this phenomenon a couple of times per year. To have one's text removed from a site - be it a paragraph in a description of an eBay listing, or on other sites serving specific interest groups - asks for contacting the site by writing, faxing, calling, confirming and counting on common sense and courtesy of the person who is plagiarizing, and explaining to him what is appropriate. That takes effort and time which would not have to be spent if these people would adhere to the general rules.

Despite the fact that on my pages there are several indications (statements) that for use of my material I have to be contacted first to give permission, many do not bother and just steal long paragraphs and sometimes an entire page and publish it on their own web site, in a ebay listing or as info for a YouTube video.

It happened that a comprehensive website about violinists and instruments had copied my entire page on George Enescu (including all the images) without contacting me. That web site did not only ignore my copyright, but all carefully and correctly given references of quotes and of images were ignored as well. It was very hard to have my material removed.

The eyeway.org website had copied the entire page about Alec Templeton. It took almost 9 months to coerce them to acknowledge my copyright and that they should make the appropriate reference.

A CD label had copied an entire page as well without any reference, but instead the names of the copiers-pasters were mentioned, suggesting that they had written the article. After contacting the label the origin was mentioned.

I have invested a large amount of money in acquiring original issues of magazines, of books concerning artists, and have bought records, all to corroborate what I write and to illustrate the articles with images that I have edited. This not only is true for my articles on The REMINGTON Site, but also my original writings on Audio & Music Bulletin.

At right you see images that were copied and pasted by Bach Cantatas website and Raretet classics respectively. Of course I do not hold copyright on these images, but after I had bought these, or got permission to use specific images and having worked on them (sometimes for hours) I expect to be contacted. For example the image of Felicitas Karrer at the piano is from Mrs. Karrers own collection and dates from the nineteen fifties. The folder had been severely damaged over time and then restored by me much to the appreciation of Mrs. Karrer. The second photo of the pianist was also sent to me by Mrs. Felicitas Karrer. The image of Sari Biro is taken from a booking ad that I bought from a seller in the USA. The image was adepted for the page about Sari Biro. Restoration was also done on the images taken from the backs of Remington covers. Jörg Demus stems from a Westminster cover. In the case of the image of Wilhelm Loibner I mentioned the seller's website. But that name - Tamino Autographs - was cut off by the copier. He apparently knew that he was wrong. And Joseph Messner's image I put on the Messner page mentioning "Picture courtesy Verband der Südtiroler Musikkapellen".

Below I publish several texts or sections of texts that are the result of theft. Maybe more will follow, though I do hope not.

It may be that those who published the stolen material on their websites will start acting correctly when they have read 'How Not to Plagiarize' on the web site of the University of Toronto, Canada. This is the link: http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize

Acting correctly means aknowledging the copyright by giving the article or paragraph quotation marks (inverted commas) and by mentioning the origin in the text itself.

Rudolf A. Bruil

Page first published on January 28, 2014

Copyright Infringement using images and a review
of the Universal Stabilizing Ring

There is someone on the www who manufactures a stabilizing ring. There is nothing wrong with that. But he uses images from my web site and this page. On top of that he puts a link on his web site to the review in Positiv-Feedback Online and pretends that the review is about his ring, while my design is unique because it a sandwich construction. So I have sent a message to him.

Dear Sir,
It is only recently that I come across your pages and see that you are using images from my site and also are linking to the review on Positive Feedback Online which is illegal. First of all you did not ask for my permission to copy images. Nor did you confer with me on the possible use of the name Universal Record Stabilizing Ring. Let alone the fact that you link to the review.
You suggest that your ring is a further development of my sandwich design while it is definitely not the case. Furthermore by using the content of my pages, you suggest that the Award I won is also valid for your product.
I urge you to remove the images you copied from my Universal Record Stabilizing Ring page: http://www.soundfountain.com/amb/ttring.html
Let me know what you are doing about this copyright infringement.
In the mean time I will notify positive-feedback online about the illegal use of their review of the product for wich I received an award.
Sincerely
Rudolf A. Bruil
www.soundfountain.com

Copyright Infringement by Aryeh Oron (Bach Canatas Website)

Alec Templeton (Composer, Arranger)

Born: July 4, 1909 - Cardiff, Wales, UK Died: March 28, 1963 - Greenwich, Connecticut, USA

The Welsh-born American, pianist and composer, Alec (Andrew) Templeton, was blind since birth, and was blessed with absolute pitch. He began his musical studies at an early age in his hometown and studied at the Worchester College and later in London at the Royal College of Music and at the Royal Academy of Music. He was only 12 when he began to appear on the BBC, remaining with it until 1935. At 18, he composed Trio for flute, oboe and piano for which he was complimented by Ralph Vaughan Williams. Jack Hylton, British bandleader, brought Alec Templeton to the USA in 1935 when Hylton was to broadcast a series of radio programs for the Standard Oil Company. He soon established himself as an incomparable and sincere artist. In addition to his imaginative modernising of the classical masters Alec Templeton composed serious works for the piano, orchestra, string quartet, and voice. In his words, "Good music need not be ponderous to be good. It can be everything from Bach to jazz." His style is close to the idiom of British folksongs. In 1941 he became naturalised American Citizen. Alec Templeton was extremely successful as a radio pianist, especially with his musical sketches, parodies, etc. Some music lovers know the name Alec Templeton as the composer of Bach Goes To Town. And if their knowledge goes a bit further they also may recall Mozart Matriculates and even Scarlatti Stoops to Conga. Templeton was known as the radio and TV celebrity who in the nineteen forties and fifties regularly appeared on shows hosted by Bing Crosby, and who later had his own show called It's Alec Templeton Time. The more serious collector will probably recall that he recorded Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with Andre Kostelanetz for Columbia in the 1940's. Being a talented improviser Templeton had a good rhythmic feeling for Gershwin's syncopated music, although the Rhapsody in Blue clearly shows that his technical skill was rather limited. Alec Templeton's radio and TV fame was a good reason for Don Gabor to have a recording made of the improviser. In the season of 1951-1952 he concertised with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. It is an outstanding interpretation despite the fact that Templeton is not a virtuoso and does not play the piano style impeccably, but the treatment of the rhythmic sections are very original and his phrasing is beautiful; the blues in the second movement is soulful, foreboding the dramatic, expressive lamentation. The critics were very positive about the performance of Templeton and conductor Johnson. Another critic mentioned Alec Templeton's restricted technique, but praised the outstanding musicality of Templeton and Johnson and wrote: "...his interpretation as well as the orchestral part are very compelling." And he referred to Robert Blake's successful registration: "The sound transmitted by this record has a flabbergasting clarity and naturalness; especially the sound of the piano is a surprise." Alec Templeton also wrote some more ambitious works, including Concertino lirico (1942) and Gothic concerto for Piano & Orchestra (New York, December 19, 1954, composer soloist). With R. Baumel, he published Alec Templeton' Music Boxes (New York, 1958).

Source: Eyeway Website; Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of 20th Century Classical Musicians (1997) Contributed by Aryeh Oron (July 2007)

One paragraph copied withpout my permission

From The Remington Site:
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remtemple.html

1. He never asked me if he could copy a large part of my page.

2. If he had asked me I would have asked him to follow the rules: quotation marks and mention of the source for that specific quotation in the text or a footnote.

3. By just copying and pasting - something some young people do when "writing" a paper or a thesis - Aryeh Oron neglects the effort and time spent on researching a subject, the money spent on buying records, magazines, booking ads, etc. Furthermore he neglects the creative process of writing when putting all the collected data into an article. That process takes weeks and sometimes months. It is easy to copy and get away with it without having to mentally and physically work on a biography or a subject.

4. In the case of my arcticle about Alec Templeton, he just copied part of my writing from the eyeway.org website. He sneaked in by the backdoor so to speak.

5. It is suspected that the Bach Cantatas web site has published material from authors who were not asked or were not clearly mentioned in references. There may be authors who do not mind that others take advantage of their work. If they don't, that is their choice. But there are certainly a few who are not aware of infringement of their copyright. Or if they were they did not know how to get things right.

6. Copyright is not just a fallacy, a fashionable word. Copyright is an existing right. Everybody can read about it on many pages. There are many web sites that deal with copyright. I found that the web site of the University of Toronto, Canada, says it clearly under the heading 'How Not to Plagiarize'. This is the link: http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize

Advice: Mr. Oron, stop this habit and do the research yourself! Or mention explicitly the source.

Felix Guenther

Born: 1886 - Trautenau, Austria Died: May 5, 1951 - New York City, New York, USA

The Austrian-born American pianist, arranger and conductor, Felix Günther [Guenther], studied in Vienna and Berlin and was later a professor at the Humboldt Hochschule in that city. Felix Günther worked in the German film industry and conducted the film orchestra for several productions of the UFA (Universum-Film AG). He arranged and supervised the musical scores of specific music for films and songs. An example is Here Lies an Actor, on a text by Paul Dresser. Günther was also active as a free lancer in broadcasting, the modern medium of those days. These activities more or less stopped from 1933 on, the year the Nazis came to power. Before that he had conducted the Berliner Symphoniker when making recordings for the Polydor label (Deutsche Grammophon) and other labels like Parlophon and Homocord, already in the 1920’s, well before the electrical recording process was introduced. As a pianist and as a conductor Felix Günther accompanied various singers like Gitta Alpar (soprano), Ria Ginster (soprano), Friedrich Brodersen (baritone), Martin Abendroth (bass), Heinrich Schlusnus (baritone). He made a recording with violinist Grete Eweler for the Homocord label. He also was the pianist in the recording of Schubert's Forellen Quintet (Trout) with the Nikolas Lambinon Artist Quartet originally known as Nicolas Lambinon Künstler-Quartett. In that recording he played a grand piano of the German piano maker Schwechten. Günther is best known as the conductor who accompanied the popular, Jewish singer Joseph Schmidt. Schmidt performed in Carnegie Hall in 1937, but returned to Germany to join his relatives. Via Holland, where he was very popular and where he gave a last recital in the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Schmidt fled to Switzerland where he was interned in a refugee camp. But fate was far from kind. Joseph became ill and died there in 1942. Felix Günther however - already in his fifties - did not hesitate to flee from Germany. He went to the USA in 1937 and found refuge - as conductor Hans Wolf, producer Marcel Prawy, and also Don Gabor and Laszlo Halasz did before World War II broke out. Günther obtained US citizenship. His son enlisted in the US Army in 1942. Right from the day he arrived in the USA, Felix Günther was active in the New York music scene. He wrote and compiled various publications. He was co-editor of Everybody's Favorite First Position Violin Pieces, which he prepared together with violin pedagogue Theodore Pashkus. The book was published by Amsco Music Publishing Co. Inc, 1600 Broadway, New York, 1939. He compiled and edited Anthems of the United Nations: the inspiring national songs the Allies are singing on the battlefields and at home, obviously inspired by the commitment of America and the many nationalities of the troops who went to England first in order to liberate Europe - New York, Edward B. Marks Music Corp., 1942. Published by the same company is Liebestraum by Liszt, piano solo edited by Felix Guenther, 1941. From his hand is Piano Concerto Highlights for Solo Piano (Dover Publications, New York); A Treasury of the Piano Sonata from Scarlatti to Shostakovitch; a transcription for piano of The Moldau by Smetena ( Francis Day & Hunter, 1950). Another title is Heart of the Waltz edited by Flix Guenther (Heritage Music Publications, 1943). Gühnter made the arrangement for orchestra of Igor Stravinsky's famous Tango originally written for piano. After the war had ended Felix Günther only returned to Europe when he was requested by Donald Gabor. He died on May 5, 1951 at the age of 65 in New York.

Source: The Remington Site (Author: Rudolf A. Bruil, July 10, 2011) Contributed by Aryeh Oron (June 2013) Felix Günther: Short Biography | Piano Transcriptions: Works | Recordings Links to other Sites Felix Günther (1866-1951) (The Remington Site)

An entire article copied without my consent

From The REMINGTON Site
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remguenther.html

1. He never asked me if he could copy the complete article on my page.

2. If he had asked me I would not have given him permission to publish this article on his web site.

3. By just copying and pasting - something some young people do when "writing" a paper or a thesis - Aryeh Oron neglects the effort and time spent on researching a subject, the money spent on buying records, magazines, booking ads, etc. Furthermore he neglects the creative process of writing when putting all the collected data into an article. That process takes weeks and sometimes months. It is easy to copy and get away with it without having to mentally and physically work on a biography or a subject.

4. It is suspected that the Bach Cantatas web site has published material from authors who were not asked or were not clearly mentioned in references. There may be authors who do not mind that others take advantage of their work. If they don't, that is their choice. But there are certainly a few who are not aware of infringement of their copyright. Or if they were they did not know how to get things right.

5. Copyright is not just a fallacy, a fashionable word. Copyright is an existing right. Everybody can read about it on many pages. There are many web sites that deal with copyright. I found that the web site of the University of Toronto, Canada, says it clearly under the heading 'How Not to Plagiarize'. This is the link:
http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize

Advice: Mr. Oron, stop this habit and do the research yourself! Or mention explicitly the source. Or choose your own wording.

Simon Barere

Born: August 20, 1896 - Odessa (then Russian Empire, now part of Ukraine) Died: April 2, 1951 - New York City, New York, USA

The renowned Russian-born, Jewish-American pianist, Simon Barere, was was the eleventh of thirteen children, and the death of his father found young Simon using his pianistic talents in cinemas and cafés, earning money to help support the large family. (His actual name was Barer but when in England an 'e' was added to avoid mispronunciation.) As a phenomenally gifted boy of 11 he was admitted to the Odessa Imperial Music Academy, but when he was 16 his mother died and he respected her wish for him to obtain the best possible musical education. He made his own way to St Petersburg where he played at the Conservatory for Alexander Glazunov, composer and director of the Conservatory (from 1905 till 1912 or 1917) and two formidable members of the piano staff, Annette Essipov and Isabella Vengerova: all were astounded at the talent of the young man. Glazunov took Barere under his wing, sparing him the formal entrance examinations. There must have been a natural affinity between the creative, individualistic and human Glazunov and the young, somewhat reserved, yet strong Barere. Glazunov wholeheartedly protected the young talent against the anti-Semitic regulations in the Russia of the Czars. He also ensured that Barere would stay seven years at the Conservatory and thus avoid conscription into the army. And as Barere's nature seemed to focus on precise detail in the first place, Glazunov's influence apparently was to let him see the greater concept, the synthesis. In St. Petersburg Barere studied for two years with pedagogue Anna Yesipova (Annette Essipoff) (1851-1914) until her death in 1914. From then on Felix Blumenfeld (1863-1931) was his teacher with whom he could share the same taste. Blumenfeld certainly taught him not only to keep his strength, precision and virtuosity, but also not to neglect refined feeling and to show vulnerability in the performance. Blumenfeld was the teacher of such other remarkable performers as Vladimir Horowitz, Heinrich Neuhaus, and another strong - and greatly underestimated and ignored - personality: Maria Grinberg, although Barere was Blumenfeld's preferred student. Another pupil at the Conservatory at this time was Vladimir Sofronitsky, with whom Barere played two-piano recitals. Upon graduation, Simon Barere won the prestigious Rubinstein Prize, returned to Kiev and started off as a professor himself at the Kiev Conservatory. Like many pianists leaving full-time education Barere proceeded to make a living as a touring virtuoso. In 1920 he married Helena Vlashek, who later became a celebrated piano pedagogue, teaching the great pianist Earl Wild, among others. Barere had a career fraught with bad luck and affected by unfortunate circumstances. After Lenin's death in 1924 liberalism made place for the restrictions of the regime of Josef Stalin and this made it even more difficult to build a career as a pianist and make a living in the world of music. The start of Barere’s career was hampered by the fact that he was not permitted to tour outside the Soviet Union. Despite the difficulties, Barere was able to move to Riga in 1928 to become a cultural ambassador for the Baltic countries and Scandinavia. Making Riga his base, he managed to gain the release from Soviet Russia of his wife and his young son, Boris. A decision to settle in Berlin was a big mistake as the Nazi regime was already persecuting Jews, and Barere had to make a living by playing in cafés and bars, just as he had done in his childhood. Fortunately the family was able to flee to Sweden, and from here Barere could pursue a European touring career. Simon Barere made his British recital debut in 1934 and his concerto debut, with the conductor Sir Thomas Beecham, playing the Tchaikovsky’s B-flat minor Piano Concerto. This debut was such a success that His Master's Voice immediately asked him to record some solo pieces for them. These records spread his name across the Atlantic and led to his Carnegie Hall debut in 1936. Two years later Simon Barere came to the USA and made his debut at Carnegie Hall on November 9, 1936, and immediately was recognized as one of the authoritative pianists of the period. He knew Sergei Rachmaninov, Vladimir Horowitz and Leopold Godowsky. Barere was especially known for his legendary speed and finger dexterity; his rendition of Balakirev's Islamey and many other recordings were renowned for virtuosic brilliance. According to noted music critic Harold C. Schonberg, Barere was more than a scorching virtuoso: he produced a colourful piano tone and could also be highly musical. Just as his career was under way in Europe and the USA, World War II interrupted it. Barere decided to settle in the USA in 1939. In addition to the many Carnegie Hall recitals that followed, he toured after the war Australia, New Zealand, and South America, as well as the USA. Barere performed as a soloist with many orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, Edinburgh Philharmonic, Berliner Philharmoniker, London Symphony Orchestra, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, and Stockholm Symphony Orchestra. Nevertheless, it was through his Carnegie Hall concerts during the 1940’s that his name was kept before audiences. The New York Times referred to a recital in 1949 as ‘…one of the most amazing feats of pianism heard in this city in many a year’. After World War II, Barere gave annual recitals at Carnegie Hall (1946, 1947 and 1948) which were often recorded by the pianist's son, Boris. The performances of 1947 were released by Don Gabor on the Remington label. In March 1951 Barere also made recordings in the studio for Remington. He and Donald H. Gabor had more sessions planned, but fate decided otherwise on that fatal day in Carnegie Hall. On 2 April 1951, Simon Barere suffered a cerebral hemorrhage while performing the first bars of Grieg's Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16 in Carnegie Hall with the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Eugene Ormandy, had suddenly collapsed and died backstage shortly thereafter. The world had lost an extraordinary musician, interpreter and teacher, who was not always recognized as such because of restrictions and unfortunate circumstances he had encountered during his entire life. In his younger years he often had to keep his family alive by playing in cinema's and restaurants instead of being celebrated in the concert halls of the world's music capitals. And many times he had to flee a country because of discrimination and restrictive regulations. Since his untimely death, Simon Barere’s name surfaces from time to time in every decade with a few phonographic releases of historic performances, and is subsequently forgotten. To the majority of music lovers of today Barere's name is quite new, notwithstanding his geniality. Barere put a spell over his audience through his mastery of the keyboard, his insight in the score, and the ability to convey this by displaying a great variety of tensions and of gradations in dynamics, while keeping the image perfectly clear, as if the recreation of the composer's work was almost non physical, abstraction, an entity on its own, a celestial body, like a moon which rotates around the planet to which it belongs. The pianist Mordecai Shehori wrote: “Even now, more than fifty years later, the name Simon Barere inspires feelings of awe and admiration from countless music lovers and piano aficionados. Although his technique is the main source of this wonderment, Barere was much more than a superior technician; he was a great intuitive and improvisatory musician who always put his facility in the service of music. His pianissimo passages in fast tempos were formed brilliantly and evenly, like a string of perfect pearls made of sheer light. In spite of the often breakneck velocity of his playing, there was never a sense of rushing or exertion, but the impression of ease, joy, and elegance. Many pianists are capable of rendering lyrical passages with some degree of poetry especially in slow movements, but what Simon Barere was able to do is to play poetically in all passages, including bravura passages of immense difficulty. His lyrical phrases had tenderness and flexibility but always retained pulse and fluency. Barere's way of understating the romantic passages is particularly poignant.”Despite the fact that Simon Barere was never offered a big contract - Victor released only four shellac discs originating from England - the Remington recordings, released in the 1950’s, are a testimony of his extraordinary art, thanks also to the efforts of his son Boris Barere. There are recordings of solo pieces by Franz Liszt, Chopin, L.v. Beethoven, Scriabin, J.S. Bach, Blumenfeld. Among the more famous performances recorded live in 1947 at Carnegie Hall is F. Liszt's Sonata in B minor and Funérailles. Other noteworthy performances include, but are not limited to, F. Liszt's Spanish Rhapsody, Reminiscences de Don Juan, Hungarian Rhapsody No. 12, Blumenfeld's Etude for the Left Hand Alone, and Sergei Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No.2. There is also a recording of F. Liszt's 1st Piano Concerto. Recordings Barere made his first recordings in 1929 for Odéon when he went to Scandinavia. The four sides were of repertoire that he played throughout his career, by Chopin, Franz Liszt and Sergei Rachmaninov. Perhaps the most important of Barere’s recordings are those he made for HMV between 1934 and 1936. These astonishing discs show just why the critics were grasping for superlatives. The Times reported in January 1934, when he was known as Simon Barer: ‘Even in these days when good pianists are common, M. Simon Barer, who gave his first recital at Aeolian Hall on Tuesday, is exceptional.’ Of Barere’s performance of Blumenfeld’s Étude for the Left Hand the paper stated: ‘If the eye had not seen the right hand resting on the trouser-leg the ear would have declared that it was not possible to range over the whole compass of the keyboard with such consummate ease and unspoiled musical effect with the left hand alone. This was the measure of M. Barer’s technical accomplishment, which was at the service of a mature musical judgement.’Barere excelled in the virtuoso repertoire, particularly Franz Liszt’s Rhapsodie Espagnole and his Réminiscences de Don Juan, Robert Schumann’s Toccata Op. 7, and Balakirev’s Islamey. Fortunately HMV recorded all this repertoire as well as music by Scriabin, Leopold Godowsky, and Barere’s teachers Glazunov and Blumenfeld. The technique displayed in these recordings is breathtaking in all respects, especially as it is coupled with an astounding elegance in Blumenfeld’s Étude and an extraordinary power and drive in Islamey. In fact, Barere’s style was akin to that of his fellow-pupil Vladimir Horowitz in its clarity, rapidly articulated finger-work and explosive dynamics, yet Barere could also play with poetry and a tone colour that few with his effortless digital dexterity possess. Vladimir Horowitz himself said: ‘Barere had a tremendous technique. He played Professor Blumenfeld’s Étude for the Left Hand like a miracle.’His son Boris had some of Barere’s Carnegie Hall concerts recorded during the late 1940’s and these precious documents have been released on compact disc by APR. These display Barere in large-scale works: Franz Liszt’s Sonata, Robert Schumann’s Carnaval Op. 9, as well as works by composers whom he did not record commercially, like J.S. Bach and L.v. Beethoven, and two works with orchestra (Franz Liszt’s Concerto No. 1 and Sergei Rachmaninov’s Concerto No. 2 Op. 18). Barere’s final recordings were made for the American company Remington, 15 years after his previous commercial recordings for HMV. The confidence of post-war America and the introduction of the long-playing microgroove record created seemingly ideal circumstances in which Barere could secure his place among the greatest of international pianists. In the event, Barere died only weeks after making these recordings, and the resulting LP was issued as a memorial album. The playing here is as wondrous as ever; as Glazunov was reported to say, ‘Barere is an Anton Rubinstein in one hand, and a Liszt in the other.

Three paragraphs illegally copied by Aryeh Oron

From The REMINGTON Site
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/rembar.html

1. He never asked me if he could copy parts of my page.

2. If he had asked me I would have asked him to follow the rules: quotation marks and mention of the source in the article.

3. By just copying and pasting - something some young people do when "writing" a paper or a thesis - Aryeh Oron neglects the effort and time spent on researching a subject, the money spent on buying records, magazines, booking ads, etc. Furthermore he neglects the creative process of writing when putting all the collected data into an article. That process takes weeks and sometimes months. It is easy to copy and get away with it without having to mentally and physically work on a biography or a subject.

4. It is suspected that the Bach Cantatas web site has published material from authors who were not asked or were not clearly mentioned in references. There may be authors who do not mind that others take advantage of their work. If they don't, that is their choice. But there are certainly a few who are not aware of infringement of their copyright. Or if they were they did not know how to get things right.

5. Copyright is not just a fallacy, a fashionable word. Copyright is an existing right. Everybody can read about it on many pages. There are many web sites that deal with copyright. I found that the web site of the University of Toronto, Canada, says it clearly under the heading 'How Not to Plagiarize'. This is the link: http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize

Advice: Mr. Oron, stop this habit and do the research yourself! Or mention explicitely the source.

Copyright Infringement by eBay seller

Background on this eBay item - Michele Auclair, violin:

French violinist Michèle Auclair (born on November 16, 1924) studied at the Paris Conservatoire with Jules Boucherit and Jacques Thibaud from France, and with Russian Boris Kamensky. They all influenced the development of her talent and explains her style of playing with a beautiful technique and above all with a natural passion. In 1943 she won the "Prix Jacques Thibaut Marguerite Long" and in 1945 she was a laureate of the "Concours International de Genève", the Geneva International Competition. There is mention of a performance by twenty year old Michèle Auclair on Sunday, February 4, 1945, in liberated Paris. She played Mozart's Concerto in G Major K216 with "l'Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire" and conductor Charles Münch. This was her first major appearance in public in a concert hall. In 1948 she also performed with the Concertgebouw Orchestra the Brahms Concerto, again conducted by Charles Münch. Michèle Auclair came to the USA in 1949 to study with Theodore and Alice Pashkus in New York. In January 1951 she made her debut for the American audience with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. She played the Tchaikovsky Concerto Op. 35 and this performance (the rehearsal was on January 27) was again conducted by Charles Munch. There exists a recording of this rehearsal without interruption, of course in a more or less loose style, saving the energy for the actual concert performance. She made recordings which were released on Don Gabor's labels Remington, Masterseal, Masque and in France on the Concerteum label. She also recorded for Philips. Some of these recordings were re-released by Philips on their Fontana and Classette labels. Later she recorded in France for Erato and Discophiles Français. She was a honorary professor of the Paris Conservatoire, a frequent guest at the faculty of the Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo, and often a jury member of mayor competitions. She also taught at the New England Conservatory in Boston, Massachusetts (1989-2004). The recorded performance os the Tchaikovsky concerto shows passion and a strong and beautiful tone, not only witnessing Miss Auclair's virtuosity and sensitivity, but also letting us know how important the cooperation is between conductor, soloist and orchestra. Although the technical quality of the recording does not rise above the level of the regular Remingtons (it all depends on the quality of the pressing you obtain), this performance is of a very high standard, not only because of the passionate interpretation, but also because of the inhibited and youthful playing. According to the Nécropole site it was on June 10th, but newspaper 'Le monde' reported that on Wednesday June 8th, 2005, Michèle Auclair passed away at the age of 80 in Paris. She had been married to composer Antoine Duhamel and later to critic Armand Panigel. After a severe accident she was forced to end a relatively short career as a soloist. In 1969 she became a violin teacher at the 'Conservatoire national supérieur de musique' (CNSM) - National Conservatory of Music - in Paris, a post which she held until 1990, the year of her retirement. The Boston Globe published an obituary stating the importance of Michèle Auclair when she was teaching at the New England Conservatory and remembering the performance of the Tchaikovsky Concerto she gave with the Boston Symphony under the direction of Charles Munch. The French minister of culture and communications, Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres, remembered the great violinist "whose renown of international soloist was only equaled by her talent and her immense passion as a pedagogue, a mission which was brought by Michèle Auclair to the highest level for more than twenty years."

A long paragraph illegally copied by a nasty character (so became clear when corresponding with him on the subject)

From The REMINGTON Site
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remaucl.html

1. The seller never asked me if he could copy large parts of my page.

2. If the seller had asked me I would not have given him permission, because he is using my text for commercial ends. I did contact the seller but he refused to delete the long text.

3. By just copying and pasting - something pupils do when "writing" a paper or a thesis - this seller neglects the effort and time spent on researching a subject, the money spent on buying records, magazines, booking ads, etc. Furthermore he neglects the creative process of writing when putting all the collected data into an article. That process takes weeks and sometimes months. It is easy to copy and get away with it without having to mentally and physically work on a biography or a subject.

4. Copyright is not just a fallacy, a fashionable word. Copyright is an existing right. Everybody can read about it on many pages. There are many web sites that deal with copyright. I found that the web site of the University of Toronto, Canada, says it clearly under the heading 'How Not to Plagiarize'. This is the link: http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize

Advice: stop this habit and do the research yourself! Or mention explicitly the source. Or choose your own wording.

Etelka Freund (piano)

"Etelka Freund actually knew Brahms and although he probably did not coach her in this sonata, she plays it with an understanding that indicates she must have profited from the relationship." Listening to Etelka Freund playing Brahms one can hear how close Brahms could be to Schumann's idiom especially in the Intermezzi which are played here with such a lightness and naturalness that one easily forgets about the choleric Brahms and the more 'heavy' interpretations by other pianists. "It is like floating on a peaceful, sunny day, on a raft on the ocean towards an open destitny", as a reviewer explained. And the Sonata in F receives an assertive, yet sensitive reading. It is assumed that the sound recording was made in the Mastertone Studios in New York City where other Remington artists made recordings: Edward Kilenyi, Simon Barere, Ossy Renardy, a.o.

A short paragraph copied by a eBay seller

From The REMINGTON Site
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remfreund.html

1. The seller never asked me if he could copy parts of my page.

2. If he had asked me I probably would not have given him permission, because he is using my text for commercial ends.

3. By just copying and pasting - something pupils do when "writing" a paper or a thesis - this seller neglects the effort and time spent on researching a subject, the money spent on buying records, magazines, booking ads, etc. Furthermore he neglects the creative process of writing when putting all the collected data into an article. That process takes weeks and sometimes months. It is easy to copy and get away with it without having to mentally and physically work on a biography or a subject.

4. Copyright is not just a fallacy, a fashionable word. Copyright is an existing right. Everybody can read about it on many pages. There are many web sites that deal with copyright. I found that the web site of the University of Toronto, Canada, says it clearly under the heading 'How Not to Plagiarize'. This is the link: http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize

Advice: stop this habit and do the research yourself! Or mention explicitly the source. Or choose your own wording.

 

Felicitas Karrer

(August 26, 1924 - ... )

Felicitas Karrer p. 18, together with Kurt Wöss conducting the four year old Tonkünstler Orchestra (Austrian Symphony), by no means a virtuoso orchestra, but the musicians were working hard and were gradually achieving better ensemble playing thanks not only to the individual musicians who wanted to earn a living as member of an orchestra, but also thanks to Kurt Wöss who knew his way around. He had been a student of Felix Weingartner.

A short paragraph copied by a eBay seller

From The REMINGTON Site
http://www.soundfountain.org/rem/remkarrer.html

1. The seller never asked me if he could copy parts of my page.

2. If the seller had asked me I probably would not have given him permission, because the seller is using my text for commercial ends.

3. By just copying and pasting - something pupils do when "writing" a paper or a thesis - this seller neglects the effort and time spent on researching a subject, the money spent on buying records, magazines, booking ads, etc. Furthermore he neglects the creative process of writing when putting all the collected data into an article. That process takes weeks and sometimes months. It is easy to copy and get away with it without having to mentally and physically work on a biography or a subject.

4. Copyright is not just a fallacy, a fashionable word. Copyright is an existing right. Everybody can read about it on many pages. There are many web sites that deal with copyright. I found that the web site of the University of Toronto, Canada, says it clearly under the heading 'How Not to Plagiarize'. This is the link: http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize

Advice: stop this habit and do the research yourself! Or mention explicitly the source. Or choose your own wording.

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Audio&Music Bulletin - Rudolf A. Bruil, Editor - Copyright 1998-2014 by Rudolf A. Bruil and co-authors